Inner World, Thoughts on the profession

Interoception

I am committed to making this blog, this website, a safe, neutral space, free of partisan ranting. I have plenty of safe places to rant in my life, and I need all of you to feel welcome in my space.

I also don’t think having agency over all aspects of my body is a partisan issue. That seems like common sense to me. So here we go:

Today I am thinking about what happens when we give over (or have taken from us) full control of our bodies. What, from a physiological perspective, happens when we are not able (or allowed) to fully sense what is going on inside ourselves? And (because the mind and body and spirit are all connected) what happens to our emotional life?

Interoception is our sense of what is going on inside our bodies. This is one of the senses we use to interact with and interpret the world. Interoception is the sense that tells us when we maybe should not have eaten at the sketchy buffet, or that we’ve probably had enough caffeine for the day.

In addition to physiology, interoception helps us associate bodily reactions with emotions. This is the sense that helps you associate your racing heart with either the terrifying new boss or the delightful new love.

Interoception can be so easily interrupted by outside forces, and by the workings of our own minds. How many times have you ignored that prickle at the back of your neck because it seemed “silly”?

Photo by meo on Pexels.com

Every time this happens, our sense of interoception takes a hit. It may not seems like much, but this sense plays a key role in identifying and regulating emotions. According to research published in Frontiers in Psychology, “There is compelling evidence demonstrating links between poor or disrupted awareness of sensory information, or interoceptive awareness, and difficulties with emotion regulation.”

Meaning, if we keep denying the evidence of our own bodies, we run the risk of losing it. More or less.

There’s a lot of talk lately (still, for as long as I can remember) about the proper use and care of bodies like mine. Uterus-having bodies, specifically. I am fortunate to have the support and practice to hear this talk and let it fade away. I have over a decade of massage therapy training and work that taught me to trust the evidence of my own body.

Today I’m thinking about those who don’t have that good fortune. Those whose bodies have relentlessly been under attack — wrong size, wrong color, wrong shape, wrong place, etc. I see you navigating through the world that wants to transplant your interoception with someone else’s, and I am in awe of your resilience.

Today, I just want to say that if you need a safe space to listen to and make peace with the wisdom of your own body, I am here. My office is quiet and my door is open.

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